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News Source: New York Post

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July 24, 2013
Devils hope Jagr can help fill Kovy void
It started as a novel idea for Devils president and general manager Lou Lamoriello, and it very quickly turned into a necessity.The Devils’ courting of Jaromir Jagr was consummated yesterday when the team signed the 41-year-old forward to a one-year deal worth $2 million, plus another $2 million in...
Devils hope Jagr can help fill Kovalchuk void
It started as a novel idea for Devils president and general manager Lou Lamoriello, and it very quickly turned into a necessity. The Devils’ courting of Jaromir Jagr was consummated yesterday when the team signed the 41-year-old forward to a one-year deal worth $2 million, plus another $2 million in games-played bonuses. It came in the wake of Ilya Kovalchuk’s retirement two weeks ago. “In my stage, because I love the game, I was looking for a team where I would get an opportunity to play,” Jagr said on a conference call. “I was talking to Lou even before Kovalchuk retired, and after he retired, it was even more of a chance for me to play for the Devils.” The experience Jagr brings is valuable, but with the experience comes the heaviness of his legs, which move at a lot slower pace than they used to. Last season, he started with the Stars and was traded to the Bruins midway through, going with Boston all the way to the Stanley Cup finals. By playing in the KHL during the lockout, Jagr counted 105 games played during his most recent continuous season, and he failed to score a goal during the whole of the Bruins’ postseason run. “There was only one thing on my mind this year, and that was to stay in the NHL,” Jagr said. “There were at least three-four teams that were kind of interested.” Now Jagr joins a group of forwards very different from last season — and even more so from the group that made it to the finals just two season ago. Even before Kovalchuk left 12 years and $77 million on the table to go play in his native Russia, Lamoriello had signed veteran free agents Ryane Clowe and Michael Ryder to help contribute up front. Joining mainstays Dainus Zubrus and Patrik Elias, the forward group is indeed long in the tooth. With 41-year-old goaltender Martin Brodeur, the Devils are primed to be the one of the oldest teams in the league. Yet coach Pete DeBoer will hope to use that to his advantage, as Jagr specifically is one of the all-time greats of the game. A native of the Czech Republic, Jagr won two Stanley Cups with Mario Lemeuix in Pittsburgh, and is currently eighth all-time in points (1,688) and 10th in goals scored (681). He proved with the Bruins last season he still has the stick handling and puck possession ability to be a viable player, and is best utilized when he can start a shift in the offensive zone — such as on the power play. During his 22-year NHL career, Jagr has played for six teams, including a three-year stint with the Rangers from 2005-08. “I’d rather to play for one team, stay there my whole career, but there’s not many players that lucky like that,” Jagr said. “You meet a lot of players and get to know a lot of people, so you have to always think of the positive.” After the loss of Kovalchuk, thinking of the positive is the only thing left for Lamoriello and the Devils.
July 23, 2013
Devs goalie (not Brodeur) gets Olympic invite
A Devils goalie made an Olympic tryout roster, and it wasn’t Martin Brodeur. For the first time since the Olympics started taking NHL players, Team Canada announced yesterday that Brodeur was not invited to tryouts. Ironically enough, Brodeur’s new backup, Cory Schneider, was invited to the USA camp...
Devils goalie (not Brodeur) gets Olympic invite
A Devils goalie made an Olympic tryout roster, and it wasn’t Martin Brodeur. For the first time since the Olympics started taking NHL players, Team Canada announced yesterday that Brodeur was not invited to tryouts. Ironically enough, Brodeur’s new backup, Cory Schneider, was invited to the USA camp. The 41-year-old Brodeur is on the last year of his current contract and probably the final season of his Hall of Fame career, but general manager Lou Lamoriello looked to the future in trading for the 27-year-old Schneider on draft day in June. Schneider had been with the Canucks, as part of a goalie platoon with Roberto Luongo, who was also invited to Canada’s camp. Joining Luongo on the roster were netminders Corey Crawford, Carey Price, Braden Holtby and Mike Smith. Since 1998, Brodeur had been a staple on Team Canada, participating in four straight Olympics. This year, the international tournament will take place in Sochi, Russia, for two weeks in the middle of February. The Swedish team hadn’t been announced yet, but it’s almost assured Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist will be its starter, and Blueshirts forward Carl Hagelin will find a way onto the roster, as well. The Russian team invited Islanders goalie Evgeni Nabokov. Included for the invites to the USA camp were Rangers Ryan Callahan, Derek Stepan and Ryan McDonagh, along with Islanders forward Kyle Okposo. New York-area players invited to Canada’s camp were Rangers Marc Staal and Rick Nash and Islanders John Tavares and Travis Hamonic. No Devils were invited to the Canadian or USA tryouts, yet defenseman Anton Volchenkov was invited by the Russian team. He will join former Devil Ilya Kovalchuk, who will play for his home country after his early retirement from the NHL. * New Rangers coach Alain Vigneault is expected to flush out his coaching staff soon when Dan Lacroix is announced as the final assistant. Lacroix spent the past three seasons as an assistant with the Lightning, and will join Ulf Samuelsson and Scott Arniel on Vigneault’s staff. Lacroix, 44, spent three season from 2006-09 as an assistant with the Islanders, and also has four years of coaching experience in the QMJHL — one year as a head coach — and one season (2009-10) as an AHL assistant. As a player, Lacroix was drafted 31st overall by the Rangers in 1987, and played parts of three seasons with the Blueshirts. He finished his NHL career with 188 games and 379 penalty minutes. Samuelsson, a former Rangers defenseman, will be in charge of the blue line, while Arniel, the former head coach of the Blue Jackets, will focus on the offense. Lacroix’s role as of yet is undefined. Vigneault is in his first season after taking over for the fired John Tortorella, who in turn took Vigneault’s job in Vancouver. * Devils president and general manager Lou Lamoriello told The Post yesterday “nothing is official” concerning the signing of veteran forward Jaromir Jagr. It was reported by ESPN that Jagr had signed a one-year deal with the Devils, but Lamoriello called that “all rumors.” “We will continue to add and subtract players,” Lamoriello said, “to try and get better.”
July 21, 2013
Reports: Devils in hot pursuit of Jagr
It has been a strange offseason for both the Devils and Jaromir Jagr, so it might make sense for the two parties to come together to prolong the career of the future Hall of Famer.It was reported yesterday by Czech broadcaster Roman Jedlicka there was a “99 percent” chance...
Reports: Devils in hot pursuit of Jagr
It has been a strange offseason for both the Devils and Jaromir Jagr, so it might make sense for the two parties to come together to prolong the career of the future Hall of Famer.It was reported yesterday by Czech broadcaster Roman Jedlicka there was a “99 percent” chance...
Reports: Devils in hot pursuit of Jagr
It has been a strange offseason for both the Devils and Jaromir Jagr, so it might make sense for the two parties to come together to prolong the career of the future Hall of Famer. It was reported yesterday by Czech broadcaster Roman Jedlicka there was a “99 percent” chance Jagr was going to sign with the Devils. There was no immediate comment or announcement from the team on the subject. Another Czech print outlet reported on Friday that Jagr was in New Jersey in order to “inspect the Prudential Center” and the team’s facilities. Earlier in the week, Jagr posted a cryptic video on his Facebook page in which he said, in Czech, “As for my next job here in the NHL, I have to say that I see a lot of black.” At 41 years old, Jagr still is the best scorer available on the free-agent market. In 45 regular-season games with the Stars and Bruins last season, he had 16 goals and 19 assists, and he could be a valuable chip on the Devils’ power play. Jagr is far from the player he was in his prime, when he was winning Stanley Cups with the Penguins, and has diminished especially in his skating ability. He played last season on a one-year deal worth a prorated $4.55 million. The season before, with the Flyers, he had another one-year deal worth $3.3 million. The three seasons before that, going back to the end of his time with the Rangers, Jagr played for Omsk Avangard of the Russian KHL. The Devils are a team in transition, especially now with Kovalchuk’s departure. They signed veteran forwards Ryane Clowe and Michael Ryder, and are trying to incorporate some of their young defensemen into the fold this season. He also can play right wing, a position at which the Devils lost their best player, Ilya Kovalchuk, to retirement last week. The 30-year-old Kovalchuk signed his voluntary retirement papers with 12 years and $77 million dollars remaining on his contract. The Devils also lost forward David Clarkson, who signed a massive free-agent contract with his hometown Maple Leafs. Jagr, who played three seasons for the Rangers from 2005-08, began last season with the Stars, but was traded to the Bruins on April 2. He went with them to the Stanley Cup finals, where they lost to the Blackhawks in six games. Although Jagr didn’t score for Boston in the playoffs, his puck possession and stick handling made him a viable player.
July 20, 2013
Break for Olympics and locals in new Metropolitan Division
By? Larry Brooks? and? Brett Cyrgalis The NHL confirmed its participation in the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games yesterday, thus allowing for release of the 2013-14 schedule that will feature a long opening road trip for the Rangers consisting of nine games prior to the club’s Garden debut on Oct...
July 18, 2013
Fatal crash pushes Devs rookie Bell
It was so dark it was almost purple, as it can be when you’re in places like the mountains of western Canada. Foot to the gas, Myles Bell was driving 113 mph when he hit a dip in Springbank Road, just outside the city limits of Calgary. He lost...
Fatal crash pushes Devils rookie Bell
Emily Matthewson TEENAGE TRAGEDY: Devils prospect Myles Bell was behind the wheel in 2011 when his car, going 113 mph and carrying 17-year-old Emily Matthewson (inset), was in an accident, killing her. (Getty Images) It was so dark it was almost purple, as it can be when you’re in places like the mountains of western Canada. Foot to the gas, Myles Bell was driving 113 mph when he hit a dip in Springbank Road, just outside the city limits of Calgary. He lost control, and the car began to flip… and flip … and flip. Wearing no seat belt, the 17-year-old Bell was ejected from the car immediately. The girl secured next to him in the passenger seat, 18-year-old Emily Matthewson, was not so lucky. Bell hobbled on a broken leg to the nearest house, and by the time the ambulances arrived, Matthewson was dead. “This crime has left me without one of the few things that truly mattered to me,” Bruce Matthewson, Emily’s father, told the court months later, according to the Calgary Sun. “At this point I live in hell on Earth and find it difficult to find a reason to keep on living.” On Tuesday, Bell stood with his bare feet on a fluffy red carpet, his hockey shorts and shin guards still strapped on and the logo of the New Jersey Devils just steps away in the center of the room. That is the franchise that has gone out on a limb and taken a chance on Bell, drafting him in the sixth round just a month ago, two years and two months exactly after the crash that changed his life. “I had to grow up, I had no other options,” Bell said in a quiet Prudential Center locker room on the second day of the team’s prospect camp. “I had to realize I wasn’t invincible, I wasn’t Superman, and live with it.” The same year as the crash, 2011, was Bell’s first with his name in the NHL Draft. He was a standout defenseman for the Regina Pats of the Western Hockey League, but his monster right-handed slap shot was hard to see through the glaring light of his accident, along with court papers stating Bell and Matthewson were intoxicated at the time of the accident. The impaired driving charge was dropped, but Bell sent out a letter of apology and pled guilty to a charge of dangerous driving. All 30 teams passed. “It was a hard thing to go through,” Bell said. “But it made me better, personally and as a hockey player.” Regina general manager Brent Parker had a daughter who was friends with Emily Matthewson, and he cried at the press conference explaining what happened. In September, he traded Bell to the Kelowna Rockets, with whom Bell had a good enough year to be ranked the 46th best skater by Central Scouting — and go undrafted yet again. That fall, Rangers GM Glen Sather invited him to camp on a tryout basis, and Bell got his first taste of what the NHL and New York could be like, heading to the MSG Training Center in Westchester and being blown away. “They were great to invite me, and they have such a wonderful facility,” Bell said. “But it just didn’t work out.” Bell went back to Kelowna, where his coach Ryan Huska moved him from defense to wing so that booming shot could be better utilized. He led the team in goals (38) and assists (55) in 69 games, and Devils president and GM Lou Lamoriello took notice. The two spoke at the NHL combine in Toronto before the draft, and come the 160th overall pick, Lamoriello took a calculated chance. “We would not have drafted him,” Lamoriello told The Post, “if we weren’t comfortable with where he’s at.” Lamoriello has visions of Bell using what he called “an NHL shot” and his experience as a defenseman, to man the power-play point, though that may have to wait. Even with Ilya Kovalchuk now in Russia and the Devils looking for as many good right-wingers as possible, Bell knows he will have to be patient. “It would be my wish to play here,” Bell said. “But I’ve learned I just have to keep working, and hopefully some good can come of it.”
July 16, 2013
DeBoer’s team moves on
First came the shock, then the disappointment, and then Pete DeBoer decided to move on. The Devils coach was dealt one of the cruelest of blows last Thursday when his best player, Ilya Kovalchuk, decided to leave in the prime of his career to play in his native Russia. Signing...
DeBoer’s Devils move on without Kovalchuk
KOV-ER TIME: Coach Pete DeBoer and the Devils have to get used to life without Ilya Kovalchuk, who bolted the team last week. (Getty Images) First came the shock, then the disappointment, and then Pete DeBoer decided to move on. The Devils coach was dealt one of the cruelest of blows last Thursday when his best player, Ilya Kovalchuk, decided to leave in the prime of his career to play in his native Russia. Signing his voluntary retirement papers, the 30-year-old right wing burned $77 million and 12 years of contract with the Devils, leaving a sour taste in everyone’s mouth but his own. Yesterday, at the first day of the Devils’ prospect camp in Newark, DeBoer was as candid as always in addressing the situation publicly for the first time. “Of course [it is] disappointing,” DeBoer said about losing the player who led all NHL forwards in ice time over the past three years. “It’s tough to express, but when something comes at you like that from left field, it’s something you don’t even consider as an option. When it hits you, it’s obviously disappointing, but you catch your breath for a day and then get ready to move forward.” It was announced yesterday Kovalchuk signed a four-year deal with SKA St. Petersburg for what has been reported as between $15 million and $20 million per year. For the Devils organization and their fans, betrayal is a word not too far from their lips, although DeBoer won’t go quite that far. “I don’t feel that way,” DeBoer said. “Maybe I should, but I don’t. I enjoyed working with him, he was a good pro, he was a good teammate in the dressing room and he’ll be missed. That’s my feelings on it. “I don’t go any deeper than that. Everybody has a personal life and personal decisions regarding their career and it’s not my place to be stepping into those.” DeBoer said he had some discussion with president and general manager Lou Lamoriello about the possibility of Kovalchuk returning to Russia, where he played during the lockout and where he stayed during the first three days of the Devils’ abbreviated training camp, participating in the KHL’s All-Star game. Yet when Kovalchuk returned, DeBoer said he didn’t get any sense the veteran right wing was still thinking about it going home, or that he wasn’t giving it his all for the Devils. “From what I’ve read, after the lockout, this was in the back of his head,” DeBoer said. “But I never saw it at ground zero. On a day-to-day basis I thought he came and worked and was a good teammate.” Now DeBoer has a very different team on his hands than the one that made it to the Stanley Cup finals just two years ago. He no longer has Kovalchuk or Zach Parise, but has added recent free-agent signings Ryane Clowe, Michael Ryder and Rostislav Olesz. “There’s no hiding the fact it’s a big hole,” DeBoer said of losing Kovalchuk. “It’s a big ice-time hole, specialty teams, five-on-five. He’s one of the best players in the world, so there’s a hole there and we have to find a way as a group to fill it.” Yet DeBoer is wise enough to know expectations around the organization haven’t changed. “You know my boss,” he said, referring to Lamoriello. “There’s no taking your foot off the gas, because some of these things happen.”
July 15, 2013
DeBoer shocked that Kovalchuk left Devils for KHL
Maybe Devils coach Pete DeBoer had an inkling, but the departure of his best player was still a tough blow. During Monday’s opening of the team’s prospect camp in Newark, DeBoer lamented the defection of Ilya Kovalchuk to the Russia-based KHL, where he officially signed a four-year deal with SKA St. Peterburg worth a reported $15-20 million per season. DeBoer said he had had conversations with Devils president and general manager Lou Lamoriello about the possibility of Kovalchuck leaving, but the announcement still shocked him. “Of course disappointing,” DeBoer said. “It’s tough to express, but when something comes at you like that from left field, it’s something you don’t even consider as an option. When it hits you, it’s obviously disappointing, but you catch your breath for a day and then get ready to move forward.” Kovalchuck was the Devils’ ice-time leader, and spent more time on the ice than any other forward in the league over the past three seasons. He still had 12 years and $77 million left on his contract when he decided to sign his voluntary retirement papers on Thursday. His retirement will void his $6.67 million annual salary cap hit. Part of DeBoer’s shock came from the fact that he never sensed this decision coming while dealing with Kovalchuk last season – even after he showed up to training camp three days late so he could participate in the KHL’s All-Star weekend. “I never sensed that,” DeBoer said. “He came back with a little bit of a mindset that he wanted to go back, according to what I’ve read. After the lockout, this was in the back of his head. But I never saw it at ground zero, on a day-to-day basis I thought he came and worked and was a good teammate.” *** The Islanders avoided arbitration with restricted free-agent forward Josh Bailey as he signed a five-year, $16.5 million contract on Monday. Bailey, 23, had filed for an arbitration hearing that would have been scheduled for late-July or early-August, but now he and the team can rest easy. The contract will carry a $3.3 million salary cap hit and will take Bailey to unrestricted free agency at the age of 28. bcyrgalis@nypost.com
Former Devils star Kovalchuk signs with St. Petersburg in KHL
MOSCOW — Russian team SKA St. Petersburg says it has signed forward Ilya Kovalchuk to a four-year contract. Last week, Kovalchuk walked away from $77 million left on his 15-year contract with the New Jersey Devils. SKA did not disclose the terms of the deal with Kovalchuk in its statement Monday...
July 14, 2013
Blame lockout for Kovalchuk bolting Devs
Revenue increased on a per capita basis, TV ratings reached record levels and the NHL conducted business as usual once the Board of Governors unlocked the doors in January, but Owners’ Lockout III did indeed produce collateral damage, with Ilya Kovalchuk serving as Exhibit A. The tidal wave of condemnation...
July 13, 2013
Mull and void: Ilya can return in ’18
Ilya Kovalchuk will be removed from the “voluntary retired list” upon reaching his 35th birthday on April 15, 2018, and thereby would become an unrestricted free agent if the winger were to pursue a return to the NHL for the 2018-19 season. This is according to Bylaw 8.5 (c...
July 12, 2013
Devs’ Kovalchuk retires, leaving $77M on table
The 17-year nullified contract that became a 15-year deal ended yesterday after just three years. That’s three years (plus a part of a preceding fourth) in New Jersey and out for Ilya Kovalchuk, who has ended his NHL career at the age of 30 to return to his Russian...
July 11, 2013
Devils' Kovalchuk shockingly retires from NHL, leaves $77 million behind
Getty ImagesIlya Kovalchuk. Devils superstar forward Ilya Kovalchuk is retiring from the NHL and returning to Russia. The Devils released the stunning news Thursday afternoon in a statement, saying that the 30-year-old Kovalchuk had alerted them earlier this year that he wanted to return home with his family after 11...
Devils' Kovalchuk shockingly retires from NHL, leaves $77 million behind
Getty ImagesIlya Kovalchuk. Devils superstar forward Ilya Kovalchuk is retiring from the NHL and returning to Russia. The Devils released the stunning news Thursday afternoon in a statement, saying that the 30-year-old Kovalchuk had alerted them earlier this year that he wanted to return home with his family after 11...
Zidlicky stays with Devs
The Devils re-signed unrestricted free agent defenseman Marek Zidlicky to a one-year contract yesterday, with the monetary amount not released by the club.Zidlicky, 36, was obtained before the trade deadline two seasons ago when he helped the Devils make it to the Stanley Cup finals, where they lost to...
July 8, 2013
Devs send Tallinder to Sabres
In a move that is as much a show of confidence in his young defensemen as a salary dump, Devils general manager Lou Lamoriello yesterday traded veteran blueliner Henrik Tallinder to the Sabres in exchange for minor league forward Riley Boychuk.Tallinder, 34, was set to make $3.5 million...
Devs send Tallinder to Sabres
In a move that is as much a show of confidence in his young defensemen as a salary dump, Devils general manager Lou Lamoriello yesterday traded veteran blueliner Henrik Tallinder to the Sabres in exchange for minor league forward Riley Boychuk.Tallinder, 34, was set to make $3.5 million...
July 6, 2013
Devils sign Clowe, Ryder; Clarkson gone
It wasn’t as much a cross-river coup as it was a move made out of necessity, so at Friday’s opening of the NHL free-agent market, Ryane Clowe went west. The 30-year-old power forward, who finished last season with the Rangers, signed a sweetheart five-year deal with the Devils...
July 5, 2013
Devils sign former Rangers forward Clowe to five-year deal
Getty ImagesRyane Clowe will be going from the Rangers to the Devils. Ryane Clowe won't have to go very far. The former Rangers forward signed a five-year, $24.25 million contract Friday, The Post has confirmed. The deal was initially reported by the Associated Press. San Jose traded Clowe...
Devils give Elias new 3-year deal
The Devils may be a different looking team than they were last year, but general manager Lou Lamoriello made sure they won’t look too different.Yesterday, one day before free agency officially begins, Lamoriello locked up the franchise’s leading scorer, Patrik Elias, with a three-year, $16.5 million...
July 1, 2013
Devs draft Brodeur’s son
Martin Brodeur’s career is in its twilight, but that doesn’t mean there will never be a Brodeur in a Devils uniform again.With the NHL Draft winding down yesterday, the Devils traded for the 208th pick from the Kings in exchange for a seventh round pick in 2015...
Devs secure Marty’s heir
It was a Lou-Lou. That’s what the trade announced at yesterday’s Entry Draft in New Jersey was, that’s for sure, in which general manager Lou Lamoriello and the Devils acquired their goaltender of the near future in exchange for the ninth overall pick, who might have been...

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